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Cookbooks - English Bread and Yeast Cookery by Elizabeth David
English Bread and Yeast Cookery by Elizabeth David Published November 11 1977Publisher Allen LaneLinked ISBNs9780670296538 Hardcover (United States) 9/16/19809780964360006 Hardcover (United States) 3/13/1995
In this universally acclaimed book Elizabeth David deals with all aspects of flour-milling, yeast, bread ovens and the different types of bread and flour available. The recipes cover yeast cookery of all kinds, and the many lovely, old-fashioned spiced breads, buns, pancakes and muffins, among others, are all described with her typical elegance and unrivaled knowledge.

Cookbooks - English Bread and Yeast Cookery by Elizabeth David

English Bread and Yeast Cookery by Elizabeth David
Published November 11 1977
Publisher Allen Lane
Linked ISBNs
9780670296538 Hardcover (United States) 9/16/1980
9780964360006 Hardcover (United States) 3/13/1995

In this universally acclaimed book Elizabeth David deals with all aspects of flour-milling, yeast, bread ovens and the different types of bread and flour available. The recipes cover yeast cookery of all kinds, and the many lovely, old-fashioned spiced breads, buns, pancakes and muffins, among others, are all described with her typical elegance and unrivaled knowledge.

— 5 days ago with 1 note
#English Bread and Yeast Cookery  #Elizabeth David  #tf cookbooks  #TF Books  #bread  #yeast  #baking 
Elizabeth David’s French Provincial Cooking (first published in 1960)

Elizabeth David’s French Provincial Cooking (first published in 1960)

— 5 days ago with 1 note
#French Provincial Cooking  #Elizabeth David  #tf cookbooks  #TF Books 
A book of Mediterranean Food by Elizabeth David
1950: Mediterranean Food, decorated by John Minton. London: John Lehmann OCLC 1363273Elizabeth David CBE Born Elizabeth Gwynne; December 26, 1913Died: May 22, 1992, at her home in Chelsea, London, United KingdomShe was a British cookery writer who, in the mid-20th century, strongly influenced the revitalisation of the art of home cookery with articles and books about European cuisines and traditional British dishes.Awards: James Beard Award for Cookbook Hall of Fame——from an article by Tim Hayward in The Guardian, Wednesday 1 July 2009:She famously moved food writing out of the dark didactic corners of domestic science and began to write beautifully and poetically about food as a sensual experience, but she also in her early career wrote unashamedly for the posh and focused attention away from British cuisine and on to Mediterranean food. I find it hard to read her work without enjoyment but it also defines a kind of “holidays-in-Provence” middle-class elitism.David was never a simple character. She was extremely private, almost impossible to interview and showed a truly patrician disregard for social niceties. Even her best friends have said that her high standards and plain speaking sometimes made her difficult.She amassed a vast collection of food books during her lifetime and was an assiduous annotator. When she died in 1992, her personal effects and cooking equipment were auctioned off to fans and collectors, but few knew about the confusing litter of notes, in pencil in the book margins, scrawled on receipts and scraps of paper and latterly on buttercup-yellow sticky notes. It has taken years for Ross to quietly and diligently file every single annotation in preservative envelopes with a cross-reference to the volume and page where they were found.These scribbles were personal, written purely as aides-mémoire or occasionally as expressions of joy or outrage. Still unpublished, they were written with no view to posterity yet they reflect her erudition, her humour and her legendary waspishness. But to a David agnostic such as me they are also little short of an epiphany. Trawling through her notes is like reading an undiscovered stash of pornography by Charlotte Bronte or a long-buried draft of early chick-lit from Ernest Hemingway.There’s a light dusting of yellow stickies with general comments to set the tone: “p166 This is NOT a tian [a Provencal mixed-vegetable gratin]”; “This is a useless book”; and “Chocolate in the Renaissance?” There are comments that should be engraved on every modern food writer’s heart: “Why say crispy when crisp is more expressive?”

A book of Mediterranean Food by Elizabeth David

1950: Mediterranean Food, decorated by John Minton. London: John Lehmann OCLC 1363273

Elizabeth David CBE
Born Elizabeth Gwynne; December 26, 1913
Died: May 22, 1992, at her home in Chelsea, London, United Kingdom
She was a British cookery writer who, in the mid-20th century, strongly influenced the revitalisation of the art of home cookery with articles and books about European cuisines and traditional British dishes.
Awards: James Beard Award for Cookbook Hall of Fame
——
from an article by Tim Hayward in The Guardian, Wednesday 1 July 2009:
She famously moved food writing out of the dark didactic corners of domestic science and began to write beautifully and poetically about food as a sensual experience, but she also in her early career wrote unashamedly for the posh and focused attention away from British cuisine and on to Mediterranean food. I find it hard to read her work without enjoyment but it also defines a kind of “holidays-in-Provence” middle-class elitism.
David was never a simple character. She was extremely private, almost impossible to interview and showed a truly patrician disregard for social niceties. Even her best friends have said that her high standards and plain speaking sometimes made her difficult.
She amassed a vast collection of food books during her lifetime and was an assiduous annotator. When she died in 1992, her personal effects and cooking equipment were auctioned off to fans and collectors, but few knew about the confusing litter of notes, in pencil in the book margins, scrawled on receipts and scraps of paper and latterly on buttercup-yellow sticky notes. It has taken years for Ross to quietly and diligently file every single annotation in preservative envelopes with a cross-reference to the volume and page where they were found.
These scribbles were personal, written purely as aides-mémoire or occasionally as expressions of joy or outrage. Still unpublished, they were written with no view to posterity yet they reflect her erudition, her humour and her legendary waspishness. But to a David agnostic such as me they are also little short of an epiphany. Trawling through her notes is like reading an undiscovered stash of pornography by Charlotte Bronte or a long-buried draft of early chick-lit from Ernest Hemingway.
There’s a light dusting of yellow stickies with general comments to set the tone: “p166 This is NOT a tian [a Provencal mixed-vegetable gratin]”; “This is a useless book”; and “Chocolate in the Renaissance?” There are comments that should be engraved on every modern food writer’s heart: “Why say crispy when crisp is more expressive?”

— 5 days ago with 1 note
#tf books  #tf cookbooks  #A book of Mediterranean Food  #Elizabeth David 
Edward Ardizzone - children’s illustrator

Edward Ardizzone - children’s illustrator

— 5 days ago with 2 notes
#tf books  #tf illustration  #reading  #cat 

rhamphotheca:

Bird-World Star David Allen Sibley Releases New Guide

Long-awaited second edition of legendary bird guide adds new images and species

by Ellen Gamerman

This week, David Allen Sibley released a long-awaited update to his 2000 best seller, “The Sibley Guide to Birds,” a popular field guide that helped turn him into a birding legend.

That star status counted for exactly nothing last Sunday as Mr. Sibley stood in the snow near the Concord River in central Massachusetts making pish-pish-pish sounds to lure birds from the frozen underbrush. Eventually, a chickadee popped out, took one look at him and hopped away. As he trudged back to his car, he regretted not trying to stir up more action by imitating the shriek of a wounded mouse.

It is this unpretentious approach that has won Mr. Sibley a devoted following, helping him sell more than 1.75 million copies of his various field guides. He’s studious, even on days when he can scare up little more than a small songbird. He doesn’t try to spot 700 birds a year or master every birdcall. Instead, he aims to observe a single bird for about 15 minutes—a slow pace that would frustrate enthusiasts out to spot 100 species in a day. “If there was an Olympics of birding, I wouldn’t necessarily come out on top,” he said…

(read more: Wall Street Journal)

photo: Bob O’Connor for The Wall Street Journal

(via thursdayfilebuzz)

— 5 days ago with 404 notes
#TF Books  #david allen sibley  #tf birds  #The Sibley Guide to Birds 

thursdayfilefaces:

Faces - Paulo Freire
Born: September 19, 1921, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil
Died: May 2, 1997, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Freire enrolled at Law School at the University of Recife in 1943. He also studied philosophy, more specifically phenomenology, and the psychology of language. Although admitted to the legal bar, he never actually practiced law but instead worked as a teacher in secondary schools teaching Portuguese. In 1944, he married Elza Maia Costa de Oliveira, a fellow teacher. The two worked together and had five children. In 1986, his wife Elza died. / Freire married Maria Araújo Freire, who continues with her own educational work. Freire often said that Nita saved his life, she was the culmination of the radical love he sought.
In 1967, Freire published his first book, Education as the Practice of Freedom. He followed this with his most famous book, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, first published in Portuguese in 1968. Then published in 1970 in both Spanish and English, vastly expanding its reach.

— 5 days ago with 5 notes
#tf books  #Paulo freire  #Pedagogy of the Oppressed 
Books - You never realize how many books you have until you relocate.

Books - You never realize how many books you have until you relocate.

— 1 week ago with 1 note
#TF Books